About

View CRR Hillin’s portfolio.

CRR Hillin…exists, technically, in several dimensions. Pronouns such as “she” or “they” are…adequate. Current theories include: crossroads demon, medieval dragon, eldritch horror, eccentric billionaire playboy, Japanese radish spirit, prehistoric creature that refuses to evolve, old-timey witch doctor, very niche gay icon, goddess but with vaccine damage, The Loch Ness Monster’s less popular cousin, thing that killed the dinosaurs, the embodiment of the KT extinction, a source of unlimited biofuel, either the cure for or cause of cancer, and others, based on papers from all over academia.

Perhaps it’s best not to ask questions.

Hillin likes chocolate and large piles of shiny things. Her weaknesses are phone calls and Valyrian steel. Cameras tend to melt when she is around, but with the advancements of technology, we have acquired this image:

Hillin was born in Texas and went to college at the University of Texas at Austin. She graduated with a dual major in Psychology and Pre-Medical Studies in 2014.

Hillin has been a writer since 2005, when a hurricane forced her from her home at the age of 13. Her family drifted from one family’s house to another, and while sleeping on floors and in guests rooms she filled a MEAD journal with visions from her dreams that formed the beginnings of The Orphan’s Code. She finished it within three months and set out to get it published. She did not succeed until she took matters in her own hands in 2018, but the journey led her to some strange, exciting places – foremost to Wordlink Agency in 2021, where she found representation for her upcoming YA retelling, Bloodthirst.

Hillin formed her own editing company, Bookworm Publishing, in 2015. She was a freelance editor mostly for new, unpublished authors, and many of the works she edited remained unpublished, but it turns out she is very good at finding and correcting tiny problems that everyone else has overlooked (as numerous significant others could attest). She is a firm believer in the Oxford Comma and will brutally critique everything from dialogue tags to racist undertones in any books unfortunate enough to be under her control.

Hillin’s career outside of writing began with an interest in obstetrics, steered into nursing, and then veered off unexpectedly into childcare. She attempted to course-correct by enrolling in a Master’s of Social Work program in order to become a therapist, but was derailed again into a short career as a middle-school teacher. There are interesting stories behind all of this, especially her brief foray into clockmaking, but they are irrelevant. Hillin insists that the diversity in careers and interests actually makes her more valuable as an author, or indeed as any kind of employee, but this is debatable.

Currently an intern for Touchpoint Press, with a book deal in the works, Hillin has no idea what the future holds in store, but against all adversity (and advice from professionals) remains optimistic.